Making the Most of London’s Traditional Food Scene

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London's food scene is getting better and better, and the only regret most travelers have is that they do not get enough time to enjoy it all before leaving. To really enjoy London's food scene, you must take up every minute you're in the city to explore its essential dishes. One of the best ways to maximize your time in London is to drop off your bags at one of the many luggage locations of LuggageHero and let them take care of your baggage on your arrival and departure days. That way, you can make the most of London's traditional food scene. Here are some foods that should be on the list for all visitors to London.

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English Breakfast

No visit to London is complete without enjoying an English breakfast. A typical English breakfast consists of eggs, bacon, baked beans, grilled tomato, and sausage served with toast.

London's Traditional Food Scene

A typical English breakfast with sausages, eggs, beans, bacon, mushrooms and grilled tomato. Photo by Lunamarina via iStock by Getty Images

Fish & Chips

Another top recommendation for a traditional London meal is Fish & Chips. This may just be the most traditional British food of all across the world. For Americans, those chips are fries, and the fish, usually cod, is battered and deep-fried. The dish is often served with peas.

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London's Traditional Food Scene

British Traditional Fish and chips with mashed peas, tartar sauce and cold beer. Photo by DronG via iStock by Getty Images

Scones

Scones are a classic British food, and the most common are plain scones with clotted with cream and jam. You often find scones the centerpiece of afternoon tea. Many scones also include raisins of another berry.

Afternoon tea at The Capital

Afternoon tea at The Capital. Credit: The Capital Hotel London

Pie and Mash

Pie and Mash is classic comfort food, first introduced by the working class during Victorian times. It is a savory meat pie in a flaky pastry served with creamy mashed potatoes topped with plenty of gravy.

Sunday Roast

Sunday roast is a traditional Sunday afternoon meal that is served at most pubs. It consists of roast chicken, beef, or pork. The meat is served with roasted potatoes, roasted vegetables, gravy, and Yorkshire pudding (see below for details and a recipe). There is often apple sauce or jelly served alongside the dish.

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London's Traditional Food Scene

Typical British Sunday roast. Photo courtesy CC BY 2.0

Eton Mess

This delicious yet simple dessert is named after the prestigious boys' school, Eton. Enjoy a wonderful mix of crushed meringue, strawberries, and cream. This is an easy dish to make at home, but it always tastes better in London.

London's Traditional Food Scene

A traditional London dessert, the Eton Mess, with strawberries and cream. Photo by Lilechka75 via iStock by Getty Images

Yorkshire Pudding

This savory pastry is often served with a Sunday Roast. It is crispy on the outside but soft on the inside. For Americans, this isn't the sweet pudding we have in the US. It is a pastry made from eggs, flour, and milk. It looks a bit like a popover, but the crispy pastry with the soft inside is one of the most amazing flavors. These are also something that you can make at home with an easy Yorkshire Pudding recipe.

London's Traditional Food Scene

Traditional English Yorkshire pudding. Photo by DronG via iStock by Getty Images

Sticky Toffee Pudding

The sticky toffee pudding originates in Scotland. Sticky toffee pudding is made of moist sponge cake that is stuffed with chopped dates (or raisins), covered in toffee, and served with vanilla custard or ice-cream. Again, for those in the US, this is in no way like a bowl of pudding. This is a delicious cake that has a texture similar to a Tres Leches cake.

London's Traditional Food Scene

Traditional sticky toffee pudding. Photo by Ada Sargent via iStock via Getty Images

Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs were invented in 1738. It is a hard-boiled egg, wrapped in sausage meat, and then breaded. To complete the dish, they are traditionally deep-fried, but can also be baked.

London's Traditional Food Scene

A Scotch egg cut in half. Photo by Unhindered by Talent via Creative Commons

Cockles

Cockles are associated with London's East End. The cheap, staple food has been a favorite for decades now. It is a small type of clam that can be found in some of the tastiest markets of the city.

Beef Wellington

Beef Wellington is a mainstay of London's traditional food scene. A Beef Wellington is made of filet steak, coated in a paté and duxelles—a savory combination of mushrooms, onions, shallots, garlic, and parsley. Once the mixture is ready, and the meat coated, the entire thing is wrapped in puff pastry and baked to perfection. The standard British classic dish is flaky and enjoyed by locals and tourists. You can find beef wellington in some of the finest restaurants in London.

London's Traditional Food Scene

Traditional Beef Wellington with a pastry crust. Photo by bhofack2 via iStock by Getty Images

Crumpets

Crumpets are a spongy bread—a cross between an English muffin and a pancake. The batter contains water, flour, yeast, baking powder, butter, and a bit of sugar. Once you make the batter, you cook them on the stovetop like a pancake. After they're made, you can spread butter, jam, or honey on top. They're also great to freeze and pop in the toaster for breakfast. You can find some great recipes for making crumpets at home, but you really must try one when you visit London.

London's Traditional Food Scene

Crumpets are delicious with melted butter at breakfast. Photo by istara from Pixabay

Toad in the Hole

In London, Toad in the Hole is a sausage cooked in a Yorkshire pudding batter. Despite its odd name, the English delicacy remains popular today and dates back more than two centuries. You can usually find it served up with onion gravy and vegetables.

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London's Traditional Food Scene

Toad in the Hole is popular in London. Photo by Robert Gibert via Creative Commons

When You Explore London's Traditional Food Scene

You must try out the best of London's traditional food scene. Each one is a real British treat and is simply delicious! Just follow the Luggage storage guide to store your luggage while you enjoy the food and sights of London. Be sure to check out recommendations from our Wander writers for more great things to see during your visit to London and as you travel throughout Great Britain.

London's food scene is getting better and better, and the only regret most travelers have is that they do not get enough time to enjoy it all before leaving. To really enjoy London's traditional food scene, I suggest dropping off your bags at one of the many luggage locations on your arrival and departure days. Here are some foods that should be on the list for all visitors to London.

Written by Susan Lanier-Graham

Founder and publisher Susan Lanier-Graham has traveled the world for the past twenty years, filling a passport or two along the way. She has wandered through the jungles of Thailand, explored the mysteries of the Great Pyramids, and shared the night with a leopard in Zambia. She sailed in the Mediterranean, sipped her way through Burgundy canals and Champagne caves. She followed Rembrandt’s footsteps through Amsterdam. Susan found her center on the red rocks of Sedona and soaked up an exquisite sunset over the Indian Ocean in Bali. Susan is always looking for wow moments around the world or across the street to share with adventure lovers everywhere. She has authored more than 75 books and hundreds of magazine articles. Susan is an award-winning travel writer and member of the Society of American Travel Writers (SATW) and International Food, Wine and Travel Writers Association (IFWTWA). She is a Certified California Wine Appellation Specialist (CWAS). Susan's work still regularly appears in print and online. Susan is an award-winning travel writer, a member of the Society of American Travel Writers (SATW) and is a Certified California Wine Appellation Specialist (CWAS). Susan has worked as an ambassador for Travelocity and is currently a travel ambassador for Rocky Mountaineer. Her work regularly appears in print and online in a variety of publications. These include various AAA publications, Postcards for Travel Leaders, Alamo.com, Hotels.com, Fairmont.com, So Scottsdale, Uptown, Green Living AZ, Life Refined, Modern Luxury, Marriott.com, WHERE Arizona, WHERE Traveler Phoenix + Scottsdale, and more.

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