This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of  Luxe. Interiors + Design.


Andy Burgess article“Architecture is a representation of space, while painting is an illusion of space,” observes Tucson artist Andy Burgess. Known for his midcentury-modern architectural drawings, paintings and photographs, the London-born creative presents structures in a one-dimensional form, using blocks of hues to convey spatial relevance. “I create color palettes because color is evocative,” he says.

Villa M2. Photo courtesy Andy Burgess

Villa M2. Photo courtesy Andy Burgess

Burgess’ paintings of urban desert landscapes—like Villa M2 (above) and Wexler House—Zig Zag Roof (below)—are inspired by the catalogue of the midcentury architectural photographer Julius Shulman. When Burgess began exploring his own technique, “I would deconstruct Shulman’s work and rebuild the houses in blocks of color,” he explains.

Wexler House with Zig Zag Roof. Photo courtesy Andy Burgess

Wexler House with Zig Zag Roof. Photo courtesy Andy Burgess

Now, his process begins with sketching ideas using a Japanese drawing pen. Then, he’ll often create a small painting in gouache—an opaque watercolor technique—before making other versions in varying sizes and media. The results have led the artist to exhibit at such locales as the Tucson Museum of Art and Bonner David Galleries. This summer, his collections will appear in his first book, Modernist House Paintings, bringing his work to a wider audience. “I want to offer a powerful sensatio of what it is to look at art,” he says.  andyburgessart.com

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