Downtown Healdsburg has more than 30 tasting rooms, and the surrounding countryside is wall-to-wall vineyards. So when I was invited to sample the merits of this area, I wasn’t sure if I should accept. Should a non-drinker visit Sonoma County? Would I spend three days moping in a corner while my fellow travel writers sniffed, swirled and swallowed?

I won’t deny it that wine is very much a part of Healdsburg. But if you don’t mind the presence of a lot of wine you won’t be drinking, Healdsburg has some fun things to do for non-drinkers. And the countryside is beautiful.

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Healdsburg. Photo by Susan Lanier-Graham

1—Biking in Healdsburg

One of the best things about Healdsburg is how quickly you can rent a bike and ride out of town. “We have some of the best cycling terrain in the world,” Richard Peacock, owner of Spoke Folk Cyclery, told me.

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Bike along the vineyards of Dry Creek Road. Photo by Teresa Bergen.

Professional teams come to the area to train in spring. And no wonder! I explored nearby vineyards on a perfect springtime morning: 56 degrees, sunny, a gentle breeze rippling the grasses and orange poppies on the gentle hills. Spoke Folk’s rates start at $14 an hour for a comfortable hybrid bike, with free map and route advice thrown in. Be sure to pet the adorable shop cats, Cat 1 and Cat 2.

2—River Sports in Healdsburg

Depending on the time of year, the Russian River might fit into your recreational plans. “We suffered the last three years because of the drought,” Eric Markson, regional director at Dry Creek Inn, told me at a welcome reception my first night in Healdsburg. But this summer he expects the river to be ripe for rafting. Want to rent a canoe and bring your dog? Russian River Adventures awaits your call.

3—Shopping in Healdsburg

Downtown Healdsburg is one of those treasures that time almost seems to have forgotten. Filled with little boutiques, independent bookstores, shops with local art and antiques. Die-hard shoppers could easily spend a whole day in the shops around the plaza.

Bella All Things Beautiful at 302 Center Street specializes in exactly that—all things glittery and beautiful. With lots of sparkling Paris-made earrings and a bench outside to accommodate husbands and boyfriends, this is great spot to find something for that special someone on your list.

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Shiny things abound at Bella. Photo by Teresa Bergen

Fideaux at 43 North Street gives travelers a chance to assuage their guilt for leaving that special fur baby home by buying upscale toys and treats.

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Greta, canine hostess at Fideaux. Photo by Teresa Bergen

There are plenty of other great options. For example, Yasuko at 383 Healdsburg Avenue specializes in Japanese textiles while Clutch at 307 Healdsburg Avenue features wearable masterpieces from Sonoma County artists. Find out more about Healdsburg shops here.

4—History and Architecture in Healdsburg

Stroll the plaza and beyond to check out Healdsburg’s historic buildings, from the Raven Theater to old churches and wisteria-draped homes.

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Wisteria in bloom around Healdsburg. Photo by Teresa Bergen

The Healdsburg Museum, located at 221 Matheson Street, gives visitors a crash course in the town’s origins. The museum is free and open to the public from 11 am to 4 pm Wednesday through Sunday.

If you like unusual museums, Healdsburg boasts the country’s only hand fan museum, located inside the h2 Hotel. I was very sad it had not yet opened for the season.

5—Tea Lounge in Healdsburg

If you feel like you’re missing out on the bar experience, Taste of Tea offers an array of non-alcoholic marteanis.

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Expand your teatime collection at Taste of Tea. Photo by Teresa Bergen

I tried the Tiger Eye, made with cold drip honeybush tea, Sonoma white ginger syrup and a rim dipped in rose sugar. Since Donna and Nez Tokugawa opened this business two years ago, patrons can partake of tea spa treatments, such as a green tea face mask and foot soak, shop in the tea boutique, sample tea flights and order dishes from their simple Japanese restaurant. “If you’re going to do something this eclectic and foodie-focused in Sonoma County, Healdsburg is the place to do it,” Donna told me.

6—Russian River Rose Company in Healdsburg

During peak season, Jan and Michael Tolmasoff harvest 100 pounds of roses per day. They start before dawn and quit by eight am for the highest concentration of rose oil. “I don’t think anyone else in the US is doing anything like this. It’s too darn labor intensive,” said Jan as she led our group through Rose Alley, pointing out Bulgarian, French and Persian roses destined to become rose water and perfume.

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Jan Tolmasoff awaits this year’s blooms. Photo by Teresa Bergen

April and May are the best months to visit the Russian River Rose Company. Guided and self-guided tours are available.

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Russian River Rose Company products. Photo by Teresa Bergen

7—Ziplining in Healdsburg

Early Sonoma County lumber barons cut down old-growth redwoods that had been standing for more than 1,000 years. But now conservationists protect the few remaining old-growth trees, and cultivate the smaller but still beautiful second-growth redwoods. Sonoma Canopy Tours in nearby Occidental gives you the chance to zipline through the canopies of these tall trees. For an extra thrill, you can zipline through the forest at night.

8—Olive Oil Tasting in Healdsburg

Non-drinkers don’t have to let wine lovers have all the connoisseur fun. Several local wineries also grow olives, which they make into high-end olive oil and let visitors taste. DaVero Farms and Winery crushes olives together with Meyer lemons in a stone mill for a special Meyer lemon oil.  At Trattore Farms you can try their deep green Spanish harvest olive oil, and buy soap made from olive oil and lavender.

9—Take a class at SHED in Healdsburg

SHED is a huge, gorgeous, light-filled, minimalist space that celebrates modern farming. And that’s not just my opinion – the building won a 2014 James Beard Award for restaurant design.

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The modern interior of SHED. Photo by Teresa Bergen

It’s a combination café/shop/deli/kitchen boutique/bar/event space. Chic back-to-the-landers come to classes here on natural dyes, chicken keeping, ricotta making, seed saving and beehive building. As co-founder Cindy Daniel explained as she showed my group around, SHED teaches “how to be a good farmer.”

10—Hiking in Healdsburg

I went on two short hikes while visiting Healdsburg. Jordan Winery offers six vineyard hikes a year that focus more on growing grapes than consuming wine. Our small group traipsed through chamomile blossoms, with dozens of little blue butterflies darting around as though we were in a Disney movie.

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Hiking through the Jordan Vineyard. Photo by Teresa Bergen

I also ventured 20 miles north of Healdsburg to Armstrong Redwood State Reserve. Volunteer guide Glen Blackley increased my knowledge and appreciation of these ancient trees. He explained how they shed low branches as they grow, resulting in the distinctive look of a long trunk with a high canopy. Glen showed us the tiny inch-long pine cone of the tree that grows to be 300 feet tall.

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Hugging trees is scientifically proven to make you feel better. Photo by Glen Blackley

Thinking about those redwood trees reminds me of something Eric Markson told me my first night in Healdsburg: “The highest concentration of oxygen is inside of a redwood tree.” If you hang out in the redwoods, he said, “You’ll feel smarter, refreshed.” Smarter? Well, I wouldn’t swear to that. But a trip to Healdsburg is refreshing.

Click here to read other articles about Healdsburg.


Note: As is common in the travel industry, the writer was provided with accommodations, meals and other compensation for the purpose of review. While it has not influenced this review, the writer believes in full disclosure of all potential conflicts of interest.

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Downtown Healdsburg has more than 30 tasting rooms, but here are 10 things to do for non-drinkers in the heart of Sonoma County's wine region.